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Thread: Timing Belt Replacement Goes Wrong

  1. #1

    Default Timing Belt Replacement Goes Wrong

    My brother and I recently replaced the Timing Belt and Balance Shaft Belt on my 2000 Honda Accord EX. It has the F23A1.

    The next day, my check engine light came on. I hooked it up to my code reader and I was getting P0170 as a pending code and P0172 as the full code. These indicate that my system is running too rich, but I can't seem to find a problem with the work that we did. Is it a coincidence or is there something to the work that we did that I am not considering

    What should I check to fix this problem? I hate to run it too long with this, I don't want to ruin my catalytic converter.

    Anything you can tell me will help. Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default

    Check google for some good leads. Here's a couple I found. Vacuum leak (damaged gasket, missing vacuum line, etc). I don't now if 2000 Accord has a MAF, but if it does this would be something to check. Fuel pressure check is easy enough also.

    http://www.obd-codes.com/p0172

    http://www.hotrodlane.cc/New%20LS%20...or%20P0175.htm

    good luck
    1994 Accord EX
    1997 Acura 2.5 TL
    2007 Accord SE
    2001 Toyota Celica
    1999 Subaru Forester

    See you down the ROW!

  3. #3

    Default Problem Solved

    I will have to admit out stupidity and dumb luck. It turns out that after my brother took off the crank pulley, he pulled the key out of the timing pulley. This allowed the cam to turn before we really marked where it was. We reassembled it assuming that he had gotten it back into place. The result was that we were three teeth on the cam pulley out of place. This resulted in the valves closing before the fuel injectors would stop injecting and resulted in too rich of a mixture.

    I have seen one other person on the internet comment that they had suffered this problem following a timing belt change. He received no responses in two years. So thank you for responding quickly. I am going to describe how the car behaved in case anyone else has the same problem.

    It started with a scraping sound, similar to a dry bearing that was failing. I had thought that it was the alternator, but when I removed the belt to the alternator the sound continued. When we removed the timing covers we discovered that the balance shaft belt had shredded. It had come very close to taking out the timing belt as well. I drove the car on three short trips with the car making the noise. We replaced the balance shaft belt and the timing belt while we had it that far apart.

    After reassembly, I drove the car on a 40 minute trip, only to have the check engine light come on. I read the code and it resulted in a pending code of P0170 and an established code of P0172. Having not properly timed the balance shafts, we believed that it was throwing the sensors into malfunctions. We properly timed the balance shafts and deleted the DTC's.

    On the next trip the car seemed to be sluggish from a stop, and the RPM's at idle were erratic at best. When the accelerator pedal was pushed in the engine would actually dip in RPM's before rising again, and sometimes when the clutch was pushed in, the RPM's would go so low that the engine would stall out. It behaved as if there was a vacuum leak, but only at a certain point in the warming up of the engine. After checking multiple resources online, we came to the conclusion that possibly the timing belt had skipped a tooth. We disassembled again (third time) and discovered that the timing belt was off by three teeth. I am fortunate it didn't hit the valves. The timing was corrected and the results are back to my old engine. It runs smooth, no vibration, and plenty of acceleration.

    It is a great tribute to Honda that my 10 year old 2.3 liter could hold up to my stupidity after 260,000 miles. Thanks again for the response.

  4. #4

    Default

    You are indeed fortunate not to have damaged the valves or pistons.

    This points out the value of aligning camshaft and timing belt sprocket, turning several engine revolutions and checking alignments.

    I hope you tensioned the timing belt properly; allowed the tensioner to float, turned engine forward a 3 teeth on camshaft sprocket and then tighten tensioner lock nut.

    Did you read the sticky warning on engaging tensioner to engine cover stud?

    good luck
    1994 Accord EX
    1997 Acura 2.5 TL
    2007 Accord SE
    2001 Toyota Celica
    1999 Subaru Forester

    See you down the ROW!

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