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Thread: Camshaft Pulley removal

  1. #1

    Default Camshaft Pulley removal

    93 Accord

    Replacing Water Pump and Broken Timing belt. Since the Timing Belt is broken, How do you remove the Camshaft Pulley? Have clear access to the Bolt(removed the drivers side tire) but is there anyway to lock the pulley in place? One picture from a manual on this site showed about 8 holes in the camshaft pulley, but this camshaft pulley doesn't have that.

  2. #2

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    Use the search function on this one. There are posts about this here. Basically, the cheapest way is to buy a pulley removal tool for it , about $30, and use two breaker bars and a jackstand. The pulley removal tool fits inside the hex recess of the crank pulley, holding it still, and is attached to a breaker bar and you ground it against the car frame or the ground.

    Then, With a long extension and a 19mm socket and a second, 2ft or so breaker bar, or one with a pipe over the handle, you turn the crankshaft pulley bolt counterclockwise and it will come undone pretty easily. It's important to put a jackstand head or other support under the socket extension right where it joins the breaker bar so that when you press down hard on the breaker bar, the downward force is absorbed by the jackstand, not the motor mounts. This both keeps the extension on the bolt, and prevents the motor mounts from being overstressed by the downward force you are exerting on the engine.

    There are videos of this on Youtube.

    If you have a killer impact wrench you can get by sometimes without the special tool. But mine didn't work on it and lots of people's dont.

    One other method I've seen is heating the crankshaft pulley bolt with a torch till it's red hot and then just spinning it off. I wouldn't recommend it just because it could mess up the fluid filled damper in the crankshaft pulley.

    The engine rotates counterclockwise as you face the crankshaft pulley, and the crankshaft pulley bolt also removes in the counterclockwise direction. That's why you can't use the old trick of putting a breaker bar and socket on the bolt, putting the end of the breaker bar on the ground, and turning over the motor with the starter motor. It will actually tighten, not loosen the bolt, and probably break it.

  3. #3

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    If timing belt broke while engine was running, valve train damage is very likely. Before you perform a TB replacement you may want to have the valves examined. TB job is a fair amount of work that must be repeated if you have to have cylinder head removed/repaired.

    A bent valve will not fully retract under spring tension and may be detectable, or you can use a borescope through spark plug holes to check valves and pistons (could have a hole in a piston!).

    good luck
    1994 Accord EX
    1997 Acura 2.5 TL
    2007 Accord SE
    2001 Toyota Celica
    1999 Subaru Forester

    See you down the ROW!

  4. #4

    Default where 2 buy?

    Where can i buy the Camshaft pulley remover? All i need is the part to fit inside the hex.

  5. #5

    Default

    It's widely available if you look. Here's one typical example:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Honda...QQcmdZViewItem

    I assume you mean crankshaft and not camshaft.

    good luck
    1994 Accord EX
    1997 Acura 2.5 TL
    2007 Accord SE
    2001 Toyota Celica
    1999 Subaru Forester

    See you down the ROW!

  6. #6

    Default

    Would any automotive store carry this tool? The belt was stretched but as we were following the directions of removal if the belt was in place that was when it broke. So no the engine was not running at the time the belt broke, but thanks for that info

  7. #7

    Default

    So automotive parts outlets might have a rental tool. Worth a check.

    A good (500 ft-lbs + torque capacity) air impact can be successful, and may be worth a try if you're in a hurry. No extensions on impact socket and lots of pounding worked for me on a few occasions. I've seen recommendations to heat the bolt w/ before hitting w/ air impact to help.

    You should replace the tensioners or repack the bearings w/ grease. They may be dry or near dry. Failure of bearing can cause timing belt to fail.

    good luck
    1994 Accord EX
    1997 Acura 2.5 TL
    2007 Accord SE
    2001 Toyota Celica
    1999 Subaru Forester

    See you down the ROW!

  8. #8

    Default

    Okay.. I can't find any stores around that have the special tool. So I bought the Haynes Repair Manual and it says "To keep the crankshaft from turning... wedge a large screwdriver into the flywheel/driveplate ring gear"
    and under the picture for this it says "Wedge a screwdriver between the flywheel and the bellhousing to keep the engine from rotating"
    I looked for a spot to put the screwdriver and cannot find one.
    Do i need to take something off first to reach it?
    Is there a small hole that I'm just not seeing?
    The tool is probably best to use but I don't want to order it and spend that money for a one time use tool.
    Thanks!

  9. #9

    Default

    Manual should have a picture, but the flywheel is exposed on earlier (90) models by removing a rubber grommet from the flywheel cover. It's easy to see on front side of engine. This method will work, but there is a risk of screwdriver slipping while you're really turning on the cranshaft pulley bolt. If too much load is exerted on a flyhweel cog, you could break off the tip. Then you get to remove transmission and flywheel to repair. It's a 2-man job to avoid this possibilty. I discarded this method for that reason and bought the tool.

    good luck
    1994 Accord EX
    1997 Acura 2.5 TL
    2007 Accord SE
    2001 Toyota Celica
    1999 Subaru Forester

    See you down the ROW!

  10. #10

    Default

    You can get it at www.tasauto.com. Which is a good place to know about anyways because it specializes in parts for this model year series of Accords.


    As to the flywheel method, I've heard of people doing that but I tried and couldn't get it to work. I've also heard of people taking the flywheel cover plate off and getting at the teeth that way, but I don't have any details on that.

    After I got the special tool I had the bolt off in like 30 seconds after setting up.

    The tool is good to have anyways, because it allows you to rotate the pulleys without rretorquing the crankshaft pulley bolt on, which is *very useful* in aligning and realigning the pistons to tdc and also in the belt tensioning procedure (assuming you know what you are doing) when they (inevitably it seems) get partially out of whack.

  11. #11

    Default

    Ok I was under my car taking off my oil pan and looked around for you.

    It looks like if you want to try the flywheel method, take off the flywheel cover that'sright against the right of the right side of the oilpan (as seen from below the car with your feet out by the front bumper).

    It's on with 3 10mm bolts.

    Once that's off, you can see about 1/3 of the flywheel and I can see a couple of possibilities for fixing the flywheel in place against either counterclockwise (for loosening) or clockwise (for when you are tightening) rotations,using the entire length of the flat end of the screwdriver against the full width of a flywheel tooth. (for strength)

    You'll need a BIG long screwdriver. And maybe a small shim of wood to shove between the gap between the screwdriver tip and the flywheel housing just to be sure it doesn't pop out as you apply force. Also if you shim it in so that the side of the screwdriver blade is jammed way into the tooth, it will help prevent the tooth from breaking because the force will go against the wide base of the tooth and not the tip

    I've tried jamming the flywheel from the rubber access plug and that seemed completely impossible, but it looks like there is a reasonable method of jamming it from the bottom. You'll see what I mean once you g et that cover plate off.

    You might need to remove the center beam to get access to the cover plate. I've had my car apart for a while so I can't remember. But if the center beam stays on it could be an excellent place to wedge the screwdriver shaft against.

    If you are worried about the engine dropping on you when you are under the car, you should know that, at least w/ my 92, the engine would NOT drop to the ground with only the driver's side motor mount removed, even without a jack (or, preferably, jackstand) and block of wood under the oil pan. However, I do support it from below just to be safer.

    I used 2 short lengthwise pieces (oil-pan length) of 2x4, and 2 crosswise pieces, nailed together in two layers, to make a square platform for under my oil pan and that worked great.


    Remember my tip, when actually breaking the crankshaft pulley bolt free, to use a jackstand head up against your socket extension where it meets the breaker bar, to keep the socket on the bolt and ground out the downward force you are applying and not overstrrain to motor mounts.. I put my jackstand on a cinder block to raise it high enough to get it to work. If you don't have an extra jackstand, you could build a vertical support out of a 2ft-2.5 ft length of 2x4 and put a couple triangle braces on it so it doesn't topple.

    good luck and keep us posted. I;m getting curious about this method!
    Last edited by batever; 05-30-2009 at 02:19 PM.

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